Kerning

kerning: [kur-ningnoun, Printing

1.  the setting of two letters closer together than is usual by removing space between them.

I would venture to say that if done right, most people wouldn’t have a clue that there is an adjustment in spacing between characters. People would only notice if done incorrectly. It’s basic Typography 101 for readability and legibility.

Compare yourself to the professionals with this kerning game developed by Mark McKay at Method of Action.

Kerning Game for Method of Action

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Making the Pixels Pretty

Spring 2015 blossoms

Spring 2015 blossoms

Mother Nature does most of the work to make things beautiful I’d say. Capturing its magnificence is what I strive for in camera. When my amateur photography fails, using Adobe Lightroom for localized adjustments is fantastic. Photoshop gives the most options but sometimes you simply don’t want to deal with all of the layers.

Good enough to eat! Food Photography Tips

When it comes to visual appeal, nothing can succeed or fail so much as food photography. We’ve all been there. You’re perusing a menu at a restaurant, drive-thru, or even television. Sure, that food SOUNDS good but the lighting is bad, the colors are flat. Maybe you hope that it tastes better than it looks? I am always baffled that some restaurateurs put so little into their visual presentation, since pictures really do “say a thousand words”.

With some basic knowledge, anyone can make foods more appealing. This is a great resource that I found that will be tucked away for future reference. Maybe you don’t have a restaurant but LOVE to take pics of your food for Facebook or Twitter? Bon Appétit!

Using the Rule of Thirds for Proper Placement

Using the Rule of Thirds for Proper Placement–photography courtesy of seriouseats.com

Sound Typography “rules”

Typography rules poster

For a beginning typography student, these are wonderful rules to remember. Good combinations of font styles reinforce your messaging and bring compositions to life. Breaking the rules often results in monotony or too much embellishment.

For a simple guide to basic typography rules, this is a fantastic link to bookmark:

Butterick’s Practical Typography